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Falken Blog

Bryan and Wolf's Office

By Jesse Lee
A look inside the 2012 Porsche GT3 RSR reveals the familiar layout of the RS production street-car, but even more stripped down to business with dedicated racing goodies.

The welded-in roll cage come factory prepared from the Porsche Factory in Weissach, Germany.

A new improvement in the six-speed dog box includes electro-pneumatic paddle shifters on the steering wheel, instead of the old gear lever pictured above. Both hands can now be kept at 10 and 2!

The majority of the cockpit is elegantly built in carbon fiber.

From the driver’s perspective, the layout is intuitive and efficient allowing the driver to solely focus on the race. The big red button in the upper left corner on the dash activates the in-car electric fire extinguishing system, in case of sudden barbeques.

A few functions of the steering wheel include: pit-stop speed regulator, radio communication, high-beam for passing and the drink button for the pump in the water bottles. Gauge clusters are replaced by the MoTec multi-functional display with data recording capabilities. The engineers are also fed live telemetry data back to the pit box for real time analytics.

Auxiliary controls on the center console: Windshield wipers, fog lights, fans, main ignition and engine map settings. The mandatory air-conditioning unit keeps the cabin tolerable around 80 degrees Fahrenheit instead of up to 120 degrees during a race.

The pedal box assembly below.

The carbon fiber box situated in the passenger area is a unique touch from Walker Racing; de-cluttering the interior and housing the Engine Control Unit, cool-suit unit and other electronics. The panel behind the seat helps maintain the cabin temperature.

Like most of the bodywork, the doors are also Carbon-Kevlar with plastic windows to keep weight to a minimum.

Bryan and Wolf share similar driving positions and are fairly close in size making driver changes easier and quicker.

Both fit comfortably in the narrow carbon fiber bucket seats with six point harnesses, which are pre-adjusted in their optimum driving position. They would only need to slide the seat forward into position and buckle in to save time

The three connections on the seat include the driver ID, water bottle and radio communication.

New regulations also require electronically adjustable side mirrors.

The overall cabin space is as visually appealing as it is functional. Hats off to the team for the small details and innovation!